TCU Place 35 -22nd St. East, Saskatoon, SK    

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Lee Lynd
Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth
Hanover, NH, USA
Food, Feed, and Fuel, All on One Planet - The Challenges Ahead
Monday, September 13, 2010
11:30 - Noon

Abstract: 
The transition to a sustainable industrial society respresents the third major resource revolution in human history, following the agricultural revolution and industrial revolutions, and is the defining challenge of our time.  The role of plant biomass will be considered in this context with respect to the potential of bioenergy on a large scale (e.g. >= 25% of global mobility), including challenges and opportunites associated with bioenergy-intensive futures from resource perspectives.   

Particular topics addressed include: the likelihood that bioenergy is essential in order to achieve a sustainable world, understanding the reasons for the sharply the divergent assessments of the feasibility and desirability of large-scale bioenergy production, gracefully reconciling large-scale bioenergy with other competing demands, and the potential for bioenergy to positively impact food security.  

An in-progress international project that seeks to bring clarity to these issues - the Global Sustainable Bioenergy Project - will be described.

Biography
Lee Rybeck Lynd is the Paul and Joan Queneau Distinguished Professor of Environmental Engineering Design at the Thayer School of Engineering of Dartmouth College, fosuc area leader for biomass deconstruction and conversion at the US Department of Energy Bioenergy Science Center, initiator and steering committee chair of the Global Sustainable Bioenergy project, and co-founder and Chief Scientific Officer of Mascoma Corporation. Professor Lynd is an expert on utilization of plant biomass for energy production. His contributions span the science, technology, and policy domains, and include leading research on fundamental and biotechnological aspects of microbial cellulose utilization.

 

Click to view Lee Lynd's ABIC 2010 presentation